First Poland, Then Germany, Now Spain: Europe Rejects Coal Phase Out

The Spanish government is challenging a decision by its main electricity provider to shut down two coal-fired power plants. An attitude that contravenes the Paris Agreement on climate change. Spain’s Energy Minister Álvaro Nadal fears that closing power plants will create power cuts. —EurActiv, 24 November 2017

A court in western Germany says an ancient forest near the Belgian border can be chopped down to make way for a coal strip mine. Hambach forest has become a focus of environmental protests against the expansion of a vast mine that supplies much of the coal used in nearby power plants. The coal, a light brown variety called lignite, is considered one of the most polluting forms of fossil fuel. —Associated Press, 25 November 2017

For a very long time, Angela Merkel successfully appealed to the post-war German longing for consensus. She hugged potential rivals in her motherly embrace. The rise of Alternative für Deutschland (AfD) makes this much more difficult. Germany’s consumers have to pay huge bills because of their government’s determination to go green. In the current revolt against the elites in the West, few issues more divide the many from the few than energy prices and the bogus religion which is forcing them up. Strange that this issue should give the right its chance. — Charles Moore, The Spectator, 26 November 2017

Regarding your editorial “Germany’s Green Energy Meltdown” (Nov. 18): I am sitting within two miles (straight down) of enough natural gas to fuel the entire U.S. for well over 100 years. We here in western Pennsylvania would be more than happy to liquefy and export some of our excesses to help lower Germany’s energy costs. Truly a win-win proposition. Let’s roll. –Richard J. Krauland, The Wall Street Journal, 21 November 2017

Finally, the UK Treasury has intervened to curb the subsidies that can be extracted from households and businesses. At a time of squeezed incomes and simmering anger about energy bills, a pause is sensible. Ever-rising subsidies sit uncomfortably with government policies that are publicly committed to capping the charges that retail electricity suppliers can impose on the public. Britain has created a statist electricity market in a fit of absence of mind, which imposes significant costs on households and businesses. There is no simple way to change this. Hence the imperative need to chisel away at costs. -Jonathan Ford, Financial Times, 26 November 2017

The latest release of the International Energy Agency’s World Energy Outlook (2017), and the UK government’s Autumn Budget (2017) are reciprocally illuminating. The global context revealed in the WEO’s data, but not in its commentary, explains in part the Budget’s retrenchment on renewable electricity subsidies. The stern reluctance of the Budget to increase spending on renewables reveals the WEO’s upbeat headline message to be less than firmly connected to reality. –John Constable, GWPF Energy, 25 November 2017

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Comments (10)

  • Avatar

    Spurwing Plover

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    Instead of phasing out fossil fuels we need to phase out these Eco-Wackos and their radical ideas which is just a return to a miserble stone age exitence

    Reply

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    Sonnyhill

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    Solar and wind energy will not replace the “old-fashioned ” energy. Shame on the activists and politicians who misled voters.

    Reply

  • Avatar

    rakooi

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    ttps://blogs.scientificamerican.com/plugged-in/wind-energy-is-one-of-the-cheapest-sources-of-electricity-and-its-getting-cheaper/

    “Plugged In ”
    “Wind Energy Is One of the Cheapest Sources of Electricity, and It’s Getting Cheaper
    “A comprehensive survey of the wind industry shows wind energy is routinely purchased in bulk for just two cents per kilowatt-hour—and turbines are only getting cheaper, bigger, and better
    By Robert Fares on August 28, 2017
    Wind Energy Is One of the Cheapest Sources of Electricity,
    & It’s Getting Cheaper Credit: Richard Hawley Flickr(CC BY-ND 2.0)

    Earlier this month, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) released
    the latest iteration of its annual Wind Technologies Market Report,
    which pulls together a wealth of data to track trends in the cost, performance, and growth of wind energy.

    Reply

    • Avatar

      Steve

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      Racoon is back with more of his eco nonsense. On racoon, how about trying to run your house for 1 year on renewables? When its freezing cold and no wind, we’ll think of you huddlung under your blankets in you cold dark house….enjoy!!

      Reply

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    Sonnyhill

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    In Ontario, you CANNOT buy any form of electricity for $ .02 per kilowatt hour. However, Ontario frequently sells surplus electricity to New York state far below the Samsung contract price. The bride of Frankenstein stopped writing green energy contracts, but the construction of big green pleasure machines continues. Can’t build ’em as fast as she conjures them.
    Enjoy your two-cent electricity, New York.

    Reply

  • Avatar

    Spurwing Plover

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    The Nazis to were very very Green Hitler was into Enviromentalism and eastern Mystisicm just like many Eco-Wackos today are yes the Green Swastika

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    • Avatar

      Steve

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      Yes and they have lots of Socialist “green shirts” to harass you if you rightly stand up to them….

      Reply

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    David Lewis

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    If green energy is so cheap, in a free market system, it would quickly dominate out competing fossil fuels. No subsidies or mandates to use it would be necessary.

    However, Germany’s energiewende based on green energy is a disaster. If green energy is so cheap, why has the mandate to use more of it increased my electric rate by 15%?

    There is something else about green energy I need to remind you about. When the sun doesn’t shine and the wind doesn’t blow, the lights have to be kept on by a fossil fuel power plant. The capital and maintenance of the duplicate energy source also drive up the price. These power plants can’t come on line instantly. They have to be in a idle state like idling a car.

    Reply

  • Avatar

    Sonnyhill

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    Ask anyone who chooses to live off the grid. They don’t get a utility bill but their electricity is anything but free.

    Reply

  • Avatar

    Spurwing Plover

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    Solar energy is not good for the Birds great big solar pannels are harmful to birds so why dont the Ecko-Wackos Oppose them as much as they oppose Fracking and Drilling

    Reply

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