World Health Organization says Zika virus is ‘spreading explosively’

mosquitoThe World Health Organization (WHO) announced today it will be holding an emergency meeting on Feb. 1, 2016, to determine if the current Zika virus outbreak is a “Public Health Emergency of International Concern,” which can direct money and resources at the virus much faster. The last time the WHO declared an emergency of this magnitude was for the Ebola virus outbreak. The Zika outbreak is being linked to a number of babies being born with microcephaly, a birth defect that causes underdeveloped brains.

The WHO also said in its emailed statement that the virus has been “spreading explosively” in South and Central America, and that the “level of alarm is extremely high.” The Zika virus has been linked to women giving birth to babies with microcephaly and who were infected in the first 4-5 months of her pregnancy. After 20 weeks, the chances of the baby getting microcephaly drop dramatically.

The Zika virus, while normally not deadly to humans, is carried by mosquitoes after they bite an infected person, and it is being linked to the uptick in babies born with microcephaly. In Brazil, cases of microcephaly rose nearly 30-fold from 2014-2015, or roughly 4,000 cases, and lines up perfectly with the very strong El Niño event occurring along the tropical Pacific. (See video)

A few environmental activists are already using the Zika virus to further their own global warming agendas and saying climate change is fueling the recent uptick in outbreaks. But what’s fueling the outbreak is a strong, naturally occurring El Niño creating increased rainfall in Latin America. More rain means more mosquitoes, as they need water to lay their eggs. Plus the Zika virus has been around for decades, and requires an infected person to re-transmit the disease.

The Zika virus was first discovered in monkeys in Uganda’s ‘Zika’ forest in 1947 by scientists researching yellow fever. As the years passed, “it slowly migrated eastward around the globe, following oceanic trade routes with the help of infected sailors and mosquitoes trapped in the holds of ships.” Most people who get infected with the Zika virus feel like they have a bad cold or the flu and deaths are rare. What makes this virus so particularly menacing is “people can contract the virus if they are bitten by a mosquito that has previously drawn blood from another infected person.”

The mosquito that carries the Zika is known as the “Aedes aegypti, the same species of mosquito that carries dengue fever, yellow fever, and Chikungunya.” This particular mosquito requires pristine water to lay eggs, which is why the increased rainfall is so important. As El Niños generate excess rainfall across Latin America, they also generate fertile breeding grounds for the mosquito. Empty tires, waterways, and puddles are favorite egg-laying areas.

Environmental activist Bill McKibben has already chimed in and is using the devastating birth defects resulting from microcephaly to further his global warming crusade. He says it’s likely the uptick in Zika is a direct result of climate change. McKibben also writes that the Zika outbreak on “mosquitoes whose range inexorably expands as the climate warms.” Not so, say the experts. As far as Zika is concerned, the “mosquitoes in question have been well-established in the affected region for nearly two decades.”

Even more important than the changes in mosquito distribution is the change in rainfall caused by the 2015 El Niño, a naturally occurring event in which the waters along the tropical Pacific Ocean are warmer than normal. This warmer sea surface has untold affects on the climate all around the world, including an increase in rainfall in South America. This particular El Niño is one of the strongest recorded since recordkeeping began in the 1950s.

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Comments (12)

  • Avatar

    Me

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    And what is the story about a vaccine for that? 10 years down the road? Maybe? In 2016?

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    Me

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    Ya don’t understand why I said what I did. And even still it it isn’t adequate, because they knew and now making it public.

    Reply

  • Avatar

    David Lewis

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    Bill McKibben is preaching the standard climate alarmist line. “If it is new and bad, then climate change caused it.”

    A few years ago one of the many wrong predictions by the alarmist is warmer weather would permit malaria to spread far north because the mosquito that carries it would have expanded range. They were so busy making dire predictions they didn’t do any research. Species that can carry malaria are in and have been in most of Europe including some of Scandinavia. There are other factors involved such as public heath and the lack of a reservoir species.

    Judy mentioned genetically modified mosquitoes. What this is today is where a modified male mates with a wild type female, the resulting eggs will hatch to 97% males. This not only drastically cuts down on females to carry on the next generation, but only the females suck blood. The males live on plant juices.

    Continuing to release genetically modified males in sufficient number would cause a species to go extinct. I’m all for it but some are asking if we have the right to do so.

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    . .

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    Why spend (waste) the time developing GM mosquitoes, when there is a sure fire solution in DDT?

    Reply

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    JayPee

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    Dear ..

    The left is only interested in “solutions” that they approve of, such as

    genetic modification experimentation without.
    any regard as to what it might lead to.

    Perhaps in this case they were attempting a
    master mosquito.
    ( Ubermoskito / insektherren )

    Reply

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    David Lewis

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    [quote name=”. .”]Why spend (waste) the time developing GM mosquitoes, when there is a sure fire solution in DDT?[/quote]

    There is no question that when DDT was being used in Africa it saved tens of thousands of lives from malaria. However, it had to be used every year. If the mosquitoes are forced into extinction, that only has to be done once.

    The way DDT was used in Africa was to spray the huts of the villages. When a mosquito finished feeding, it would then go a short distance and rest on the hut to digest its meal. In doing so it came in contact with the DDT and be killed. However, unlike mosquito extinction, this wasn’t 100% for cases when a mosquito bit an infected person or monkey away from the huts and then came to feed again.

    Fighting mosquitoes by one from of genetic modification is very species specific causing extinction. The only collateral impact would be from fewer mosquitoes in the environment. A modification producing mainly male off spring is not going to give the mosquitoes any enhancement. DDT on the other hand when used more widely will kill beneficial insects such as bees.

    No matter what method is used, reducing the mosquito population makes a lot more sense than just blaming climate change.

    DDT was banned because many believed it would cause eggs of wild birds to become thin resulting in being crushed when sat on. My entomology professor believed this to be true. However, he brought in a colleague who believed DDT was harmless and shouldn’t be banned and we were lectured for an hour.

    Unlike the main stream media and most journals dealing with the climate who censor out politically incorrect views, my professor practiced true science. He believed that all view points should be heard.

    Reply

  • Avatar

    Me

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    [quote name=”David Lewis”][quote name=”. .”]Why spend (waste) the time developing GM mosquitoes, when there is a sure fire solution in DDT?[/quote]

    There is no question that when DDT was being used in Africa it saved tens of thousands of lives from malaria. However, it had to be used every year. If the mosquitoes are forced into extinction, that only has to be done once.

    The way DDT was used in Africa was to spray the huts of the villages. When a mosquito finished feeding, it would then go a short distance and rest on the hut to digest its meal. In doing so it came in contact with the DDT and be killed. However, unlike mosquito extinction, this wasn’t 100% for cases when a mosquito bit an infected person or monkey away from the huts and then came to feed again.

    Fighting mosquitoes by one from of genetic modification is very species specific causing extinction. The only collateral impact would be from fewer mosquitoes in the environment. A modification producing mainly male off spring is not going to give the mosquitoes any enhancement. DDT on the other hand when used more widely will kill beneficial insects such as bees.

    No matter what method is used, reducing the mosquito population makes a lot more sense than just blaming climate change.

    DDT was banned because many believed it would cause eggs of wild birds to become thin resulting in being crushed when sat on. My entomology professor believed this to be true. However, he brought in a colleague who believed DDT was harmless and shouldn’t be banned and we were lectured for an hour.

    Unlike the main stream media and most journals dealing with the climate who censor out politically incorrect views, my professor practiced true science. He believed that all view points should be heard.[/quote]
    Yeah it was because egg shell were weakened, but don’t forget the other thang they said? you tell it or be what you are? Tell it all!

    Reply

  • Avatar

    Me

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    And Dave I lived throuth that and remember that so tell it all!

    Reply

  • Avatar

    Me

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    Yeah I understand why, never let a good crysis go to waste.

    Reply

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