Researchers brave bovine bombs

cowsLocal researchers in Galway plan to measure the impact of gaseous releases from Ireland’s cows on global warming.

The School of Physics at NUIG has invited tenders for a research and development service to develop a “combined measurement and modelling system to verify CH4 sources and sinks over Ireland”.

CH4 or methane gas, according to research, is many times more powerful than carbon dioxide and contributes to greenhouse gases and global warming.

A cow can emit between 25 and 50 gallons of methane each day through belching and flatulence.

Methane is also emitted through industry, human activity such as gas leaks, as well as naturally through wetlands.

The project is funded by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and is expected to take place over 14 months.

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    JayPee

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    And where is the scientific proof that methane or any gas qualifies as to what the alarmists claim is a ” greenhouse gas , ” when in fact there is no proof whatsoever that anything is a ” greenhouse gas ? “

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    David Lewis

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    JayPee, you are right about methane, but there is another lesson to be learned here. People are being paid by the Environmental Protection Agency to measure methane from cows and other sources. They would never get this funding if it wasn’t for the climate change hysteria. This provides motivation for them, and other researcher receiving funding, to keep this crisis going.

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    Zack Theo

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    I suppose the EPA can require limits on bovine emissions to values that they deem fit, starting at 25 gallons per day, and slowly reducing the upper limit to 12.5 per day within a few years. Of course the values will be well founded in the secretive results of the research on modeling systems. The problem is how to reduce it, which is not the EPA’s problem, only the farmers.

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