Environmentalists, tribes promise Dakota Access-style camps, protests to stop Keystone XL pipeline

The protests and encampments seen in the months-long effort to stop the Dakota Access pipeline will be employed in a new bitter battle to halt Keystone XL, environmentalists and tribal leaders said Friday morning, just hours after President Trump formally green-lighted the pipeline.

Keystone opponents held a conference call Friday to outline their new strategy to stop the project now that Mr. Trump, fulfilling a campaign promise, reversed his predecessor’s decision and approved the Canada-to-Texas pipeline. That strategy will focus on legal challenges in Nebraska, where state regulators still haven’t approved a pipeline route through the state. A decision in Nebraska isn’t expected until the fall.

But beyond those legal efforts, critics say the guerrilla warfare tactics used to hold up the Dakota Access project will be seen again.

“Our dedication to stop this pipeline isn’t just for the future determination of our lives as human beings but also for the future of all generations of life, and that we stay true to the understandings of protecting mother earth to the fullest degree and do it in a prayerful way,” Tom Goldtooth, executive director of the Indigenous Environmental Network, told reporters.

“We fully expect to stand united and to continue resistance and carry forth the fire of mobilization … in the fight we saw against the Dakota Access pipeline to this next project here,” he continued.

Mr. Trump’s approval of Keystone caps off a nearly decade-long fight at the federal level. The Obama administration delayed a decision on the project for nearly eight years before finally rejecting the pipeline in late 2015, citing concerns over climate change.

The Trump administration’s approval on Friday reverses that decision but it does not mean the pipeline can immediately break ground. The Nebraska Public Service Commission has only started a lengthy process to review Keystone’s proposed route through the state.

Years of legal and regulatory hurdles have greatly complicated efforts to finalize the pipeline’s path through the state. This latest round of review proceedings will include public hearings over the summer, with the expectation of a decision sometime in September, possibly later.

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Comments (7)

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    Sonnyhill

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    Looks like more Xtra Large garbage piles.

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    G

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    Quote:
    “But beyond those legal efforts, critics say the guerrilla warfare tactics used to hold up the Dakota Access project will be seen again.”

    At what point do “guerrilla warfare tactics” become domestic terrorism?

  • Avatar

    amirlach

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    “At what point do ‚Äúguerrilla warfare tactics‚Äù become domestic terrorism?”

    They need to use the same weapon that took down Al Capone. The IRS, nail these fake, paid protestors and those who fund them for all of the unpaid taxes they owe.

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    Douglas Cotton

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    Correct physics can be used to prove greenhouse gas COOLS, and so rain forests are not 50 to 100 degrees hotter than deserts that have only 25% as much of the greenhouse gas water vapor above them. There is AU $50,000 for the first to prove me wrong offered at http://whyitsnotco2.com.

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      JayPee

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      Thermal Infrared Spectroscopy and Spectrography
      conclusively prove that co2, so2, ch4, etc
      are no more heat trapping, reflecting etc than
      Nitrogen, Oxygen and Argon.

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        Squidly

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        Actually, part of that is not true. Any molecule that is a good absorber is also a good emitter, and it is not referred to as “reflection”, it is referred to as emissivity, which CO2 has HIGH emissivity. As Doug Cotton points out, CO2 makes are good COOLANT because of its high emissivity. In FACT, CO2 just happens to be the most widely used industrial COOLANT in the world.

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    Squidly

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    Oh give it up already!!! … stupid freaking idiots!!!

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