Australian snowfields rejoice after ‘Blizzard of Oz’ turns slopes into winter wonderland

It’s been dubbed “the Blizzard of Oz”, and powder hounds could not be happier.

Australia’s ski resorts in the Snowy Mountains, in New South Wales, and Victoria’s Alpine National Park were covered with the white stuff this morning after both reported the best falls of the season at the weekend.

More than 1.15 meters of snow has been dumped at Thredbo from Friday morning to 6:00 am today.

“It’s the best conditions of the season without a shadow of a doubt,” resort spokesperson Susie Diver said.

“The accommodation was absolutely chock-a-block. It’s absolutely stunning, so beautiful.

The conditions made for spectacular photos, with holidaymakers snapping conditions more akin to Europe and Canada.

Read more at ABC

Australia Just Got 4.5ft of Snow In What Has Become Known As “The Blizzard of Oz”

Stoke levels are high at Thredbo Resort in Australia as they experiencing a meteorological event dubbed “The Blizzard of Oz.” The storm has dropped 135cm of fresh snow (4.5 feet) and the locals are absolutely slaying. Great time to be a Strayan Skier.

The storms rolled in as two bands of “thundersnow” a rare event where instead of rain falling during a lighting event it’s snow. To make the event even more magical, the lightning was much brighter than during a normal lightning event.

A “thundersnow” event is almost unheard of in Australia.

Read more at UnofficialNetworks

How do we keep track of record snowfalls in Australia?

Snow depth measurements taken at a remote location in the Kosciuszko National Park have kept track of the Australian snow seasons and charted record-breaking snowfalls for more than six decades.

…snip…

In research published earlier this year, the CSIRO noted there had been a significant decline in the past 60 years in the southern slopes and Murray-Basin areas.

It predicted the ski season in New South Wales and Victoria would be shortened by between 20 to 55 days by 2050 under climate change.

However, the CSIRO research also noted that snow dumps varied season to season and could be unpredictable.

That is something Snowy Hydro hydrographer Mic Clayton, who has been taking measurements at Spencers Creek since the early 2000s, can attest to.

“Weekly depths will vary from year to year. It’s a cycle of drys and wets,” Mr. Clayton said.

“Lots of people make their own claims and decisions about it. My job is to measure it and provide the data.”

Read more at NewsGrio

Comments (8)

  • Avatar

    JayPeeIdiot

    |

    Meanwhile Sydney is 9C (15F) above normal and global sea ice is collapsing.
    Go figure.

    • Avatar

      Kano

      |

      Not true Arctic ice extent is holding up well this year, and Greenland has record amounts of snow and ice

      • Avatar

        JayPeeIdiot

        |

        Uhh – Greenland has LAND ice and the Arctic SEA ice is more than 2 standard deviaions BELOW normal. And as I said, global sea ice is collapsing.

        • Avatar

          Sonnyhill

          |

          Drew just got another welfare check and he’s back online.

          • Avatar

            JayPeeIdiot

            |

            AND I found $50 under the bench at the bus station, however, that is irrelevant to the unmistakable trend of warming surface temperatures and the global sea ice collapse.

    • Avatar

      AdventureAlways

      |

      Please provide factual evidence of such claims – not repetitive narrative. I would not be surprised if you are totally unable to produce ANY credible evidence as Antarctic Land and Sea Ice has been extensively documented to be growing more rapidly and Greenland has recently had its coldest and shortest Summer on record…..Documented instances

      • Avatar

        JayPeeIdiot

        |

        Google Sunshine Hours – a conservative web site about sea ice in the Arctic, Antarctic and global. Lots of pictures that even you can even understand.

  • Avatar

    Spurwing Plover

    |

    All right mate just hitch up the kangaroo and emu to the sled and go on a wild aussie sleigh ride

Comments are closed